Multiple Calibre Servers under Mac OS X

By · Published · mac, osx, apple, apache, ebooks, calibre, howto

So there's this program out there called Calibre which, despite it's pretty terrible UI, is pretty much the gold standard for managing eBooks. Seriously, it's such a great program whose only fault is its terrible engineer UI.

One of the nice things that Calibre includes is a built-in web server that can serve books via OPDS. If you have an OPDS-compatible reader (I use Marvin), you can browse and download from your library directly on your device, basically creating your own private eBook cloud.

But, this presents a little bit of an issue. Namely, I don't want all of my books to be publicly available, while still providing a subset of my library for visitors to browse and use. But I still want to be able to access them myself from my "private reserve collection."

Fortunately, with a little bit of work, you can do that under Calibre.

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Pretty URLs - Serving Plex from behind a proxy using mod_proxy and Apache

By · Published · apache, networking, plex, howto

I'm obsessed with pretty URLs. I admit it. I love looking at a properly formatted URL that just looks nice.

I'm slowly converting our internal media library over to Plex now that it is available on the new AppleTV. In doing that, I noticed that the Plex web interface serves, by default, serves from port 32400. So the URL ends up looking somthing like this:

http://172.16.104.4:32400/web/index.html

Twitch.

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Securely Signing PHP Phar Files With OpenSSL

By · Published · php, security, phar, openssl, howto

PHP's PHAR archives (PHp ARchives, get it?) are a neat development. They're a way to distribute an entire PHP application as a single archived file that can be executed directly by the PHP intepreter without unarchving them before execution. They're broadly equivalent to Java's JAR files and they're super useful for writing small utilities in PHP.

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Scheduled Throttling with pfSense

By · Published · pfsense, networking, apple, howto

Apple has launched a new Photos App for OS X, along with the ability to upload your entire library to iCloud. And with prices that are so cheap, there's almost no reason not to. $3.99 a month is cheap insurance to know that every photo I've ever taken of my family won't be wiped out in a tornado.

But with this comes a problem - namely, how do you upload a 150 gigabytes of photos over a 5 megabit network connection? Well, you wait a really long time for it to upload. Which is fine, really, because I'm not in any particular hurry to finish. But, once I started the upload, I noticed that surfing the web became pretty much impossible because the upload to iCloud was saturating my upstream bandwidth.

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NSHTMLTextDocumentType is Slow

By · Published · apple, cocoa, ios

So I was confronted with an interesting bug this week, and I wanted to share it with everyone so maybe it will save you some time. Put simply, NSAttributedString with NSHTMLTextDocumentType is slow. Dog slow. So obscenely slow that it should probably never, ever be used.

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Responsive CSS3 Columns with Sass and Bootstrap

By · Published · howto, css, css3, html

Impatient? Scroll to the bottom to download.

So I recently was working on a site and wanted to use CSS3 columns. But I really like how the grid system works in Bootstrap, and wanted to be able to define columns in a similar way (i.e. have different number of columns depending on the screen size). Not finding any pre-cooked versions, I decided to write my own.

Strictly speaking, you don't need Bootstrap for this to work. But I did re-use Bootstrap's grid variables so that it breaks along the same lines that Bootstrap's grid does. It's also worth noting that, natively, the columns will collapse on their own if you specify a width. This method just gives you a bit more control.

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