Diffing files via FTP

This is an old post!

This post is over 2 years old. Solutions referenced in this article may no longer be valid. Please consider this when utilizing any information referenced here.

I ran into a situation today where I needed to diff files on a remote server against the ones on a local server when the only connection method I had to connect to the remote server was FTP. I wrote a little quick and dirty script to diff files over FTP. It’s stupid simple - it downloads the file and runs diff on it against a local file, outputting the result.

It’s great for finding changes on a webhost that cripples real developers by only offering FTP. It’s also a great companion to ftpsync, which apes some of the functionality of rsync, again on crippled webhosts.

The command format is:

ftpdiff <local file> <username:[email protected]:/path/to/file>

About the Author

Hi, I'm Rob! I'm a blogger and software developer. I wrote petfeedd, dystill, and various other projects and libraries. I'm into electronics, general hackery, and model trains and airplanes. I am based in Huntsville, Alabama, USA.

About Me · Contact Me · Don't Hire Isaiah Armstrong

Did this article help you out?

I don't earn any money from this site.

I run no ads, sell no products and participate in no affiliate programs. I do not accept gifts in exchange for articles, guest articles or link exchanges. I don't track you or sell your data. The only third-party Javascript on this website is Google Analytics.

In general I run this site very much like a 1990s homepage or early 2000s personal blog, meaning that I do this solely because it's fun! I enjoy writing and sharing what I learn.

If you found this article helpful and want to show your appreciation, a tip or donation would be very welcome. Feel free to choose from the options below.

Comments (0)

Interested in why you can't leave comments on my blog? Read the article about why comments are uniquely terrible and need to die. If you are still interested in commenting on this article, feel free to reach out to me directly and/or share it on social media.

Contact Me
Share It

Interested in reading more?

Linux

Creating a Multiboot USB Stick under macOS

Here’s a quick article about how to make a multiboot USB stick under macOS. These are useful in a lot of situations - such as for doing system installs or system rescues - because you can boot a wide variety of live OSs from a single stick. There are a lot of guides out there for doing this on Linux, and a lot of software for automating it on Windows, but not a lot of guides for doing it on macOS. Fortunately, it is pretty straightforward as the instructions will be broadly similar to doing it on Linux.
Read More
Home Assistant

Securing Home Assistant Alexa Integration

One of the big missing pieces from my conversion to Home Assistant was Amazon Alexa integration. It wasn’t something we used a lot, but it was a nice to have. Especially for walking out a room and saying “Alexa, turn off the living room lights.” I had been putting it off a bit because the setup instructions are rather complex. But this weekend I found myself with a couple free hours and decided to work through it. It actually wasn’t as difficult as I expected it to be, but it is definitely not the type of thing a beginner or someone who does not have some programming and sysadmin background could accomplish. But in working through it, there was one thing that was an immediate red flag for me: the need to expose your Home Assistant installation to the Internet. It makes sense that you would need to do this - the Amazon mothership needs to send data to you to take an action after all. But exposing my entire home automation system to the Internet seems like a really, really bad idea. So in doing this, rather than expose port 443 on my router to the Internet and open my entire home to a Shodan attack, I decided to try something a bit different.
Read More
Home Assistant

Migrating from SmartThings to Home Assistant

I have been a SmartThings user for many years. The orginal reason was that, when we bought our current house in 2012, I wanted to turn the eave lights on at sunset and off a few hours later. After a short attempt to use Wifi-based Wemo switches, I settled on SmartThings and GE Z-Wave switches. I was so happy with it that I started putting them in more places. I added Kwikset SmartCode keypad locks and door sensors. I added more switches, like to turn on the garage overhead lights when the doors opened. I added sensors to monitor the temperature in the closet where I keep my server. And for many years this setup worked great. But over the last year, and especially since Samsung acquired SmartThings, I have become increasingly disillusioned with the SmartThings ecosystem. This last week, my disillusionment and frustration finally boiled over, and I migrated to a new platform. So why did I abandon SmartThings?
Read More