#nginx

Proxying CUPS IPP using nginx

So I have this older Dell laser printer, a B1160w. It was released back in 2012, but it is a totally fine home printer for when I occasionally need to print something and it still works great after all these years, so I see no compelling reason to buy a new one. But there’s a problem: macOS support. Namely, no drivers have been released for macOS since 2017. Starting with Catalina, Apple started requiring code signing for executables, and the official Dell driver has an executable in it that refuses to execute because it isn’t signed. And despite my best efforts, short of turning off Gatekeeper entirely, I was not able to get it to work. But the printer itself is fine; there is absolutely no reason to create additional electronic waste purely for software reasons. But thanks to open-source software, we have another options: CUPS.

Making Native WebDAV Actually Work on nginx with Finder and Explorer

So my long march away from Apache has been coming to an end, and I am finally migrating some of the more esoteric parts of my Apache setup to nginx. I have a side domain that I use to share files with some friends and, for ease of use, I have configured it with WebDAV so that they can simply mount it using Finder or Explorer, just like a shared drive. The problem? nginx’s WebDAV support … sucks. First, the ngx_http_dav_module module is not included in most distributions from the package managers. Even the ones that are, it’s usually pretty out of date. And, perhaps worst of all, it is a partial implementation of WebDAV. It doesn’t support some of the things (PROPFIND, OPTIONS, LOCK, and UNLOCK) that are needed to work with modern clients. So what can we do?

Securing Home Assistant Alexa Integration

One of the big missing pieces from my conversion to Home Assistant was Amazon Alexa integration. It wasn’t something we used a lot, but it was a nice to have. Especially for walking out a room and saying “Alexa, turn off the living room lights.” I had been putting it off a bit because the setup instructions are rather complex. But this weekend I found myself with a couple free hours and decided to work through it. It actually wasn’t as difficult as I expected it to be, but it is definitely not the type of thing a beginner or someone who does not have some programming and sysadmin background could accomplish. But in working through it, there was one thing that was an immediate red flag for me: the need to expose your Home Assistant installation to the Internet. It makes sense that you would need to do this - the Amazon mothership needs to send data to you to take an action after all. But exposing my entire home automation system to the Internet seems like a really, really bad idea. So in doing this, rather than expose port 443 on my router to the Internet and open my entire home to a Shodan attack, I decided to try something a bit different.

Internal Auto-Renewing LetsEncrypt Certificates

I have a well-documented obsession with pretty URLs, and this extends even to my internal home network. I have way too much stuff bouncing around in my head to have to remember IP addresses when a domain name is much easier to remember. LetsEncrypt launched to offer free SSL certificates to anyone, but the most crucial feature of their infrastructure, and one someone should have figured out before then, was scriptable automatically renewing certificates. Basically they validate you do in fact own the domain using automated methods, then issue you the new certificate. Thus, your certificates can be renewed on a schedule with no interaction from you. Traditionally, they have done this by placing a file in the webroot and looking for that file before issuing the certificate (see my earlier blog post about Zero Downtime nginx Letsencrypt Certificate Renewals Without the nginx Plugin for more detail about this.) But what happens when you want to issue an internal certificate? One for a service that is not accessible to the outside world, and thus, not visible using the webroot method? Well, it turns out there is a solution for that too!

Incrementally Migrating from Apache to nginx

I am currently in the process of migrating a bunch of sites on this machine from Apache to nginx. Rather than take everything down and migrate it all at once, I wanted to do this incrementally. But that raises a question: how do you incrementally migrate site configs from one to the other on the same machine, since both servers will need to be running and listening on ports 80 and 443? The solution I came up with was to move Apache to different ports (8080 and 4443) and to set the default nginx config to be a reverse proxy!

Securing static resources with cookies, nginx, and Lua

I’ve been working with one of my clients the last month on migrating his iron- based architecture to a cloud-based provider. In this transition, we are going from one or two physical servers to multiple cloud servers and separating out parts to better scale each individual service. As part of this, we are moving a significant library of images and videos away from being served off the same web server as the application and to a server tuned to handle requests for these static assets. The problem is that a lot of these assets (the videos and full-size images) are for paying members only. We need a way to secure those resources across physical servers.