#nginx

Internal Auto-Renewing LetsEncrypt Certificates

I have a well-documented obsession with pretty URLs, and this extends even to my internal home network. I have way too much stuff bouncing around in my head to have to remember IP addresses when a domain name is much easier to remember. LetsEncrypt launched to offer free SSL certificates to anyone, but the most crucial feature of their infrastructure, and one someone should have figured out before then, was scriptable automatically renewing certificates. Basically they validate you do in fact own the domain using automated methods, then issue you the new certificate. Thus, your certificates can be renewed on a schedule with no interaction from you. Traditionally, they have done this by placing a file in the webroot and looking for that file before issuing the certificate (see my earlier blog post about Zero Downtime nginx Letsencrypt Certificate Renewals Without the nginx Plugin for more detail about this.) But what happens when you want to issue an internal certificate? One for a service that is not accessible to the outside world, and thus, not visible using the webroot method? Well, it turns out there is a solution for that too!

Incrementally Migrating from Apache to nginx

I am currently in the process of migrating a bunch of sites on this machine from Apache to nginx. Rather than take everything down and migrate it all at once, I wanted to do this incrementally. But that raises a question: how do you incrementally migrate site configs from one to the other on the same machine, since both servers will need to be running and listening on ports 80 and 443? The solution I came up with was to move Apache to different ports (8080 and 4443) and to set the default nginx config to be a reverse proxy!

Securing static resources with cookies, nginx, and Lua

I’ve been working with one of my clients the last month on migrating his iron- based architecture to a cloud-based provider. In this transition, we are going from one or two physical servers to multiple cloud servers and separating out parts to better scale each individual service. As part of this, we are moving a significant library of images and videos away from being served off the same web server as the application and to a server tuned to handle requests for these static assets. The problem is that a lot of these assets (the videos and full-size images) are for paying members only. We need a way to secure those resources across physical servers.