#Home Assistant

Remotely Controlling a DeLonghi Oil Radiator using Home Assistant, ESPHome and ESP32

So here we are in October. COVID-19 is still with us and I am still working from home. Meanwhile, summer has quickly changed to autumn. The leaves are falling as are the temperatures. My house was the model home for our neighborhood, and what would have been the garage was finished in and used as a sales office. So when we bought the house, I was like, perfect, a perfect spot for an office! But the problem is that, because it was a garage, it’s not connected to the house’s HVAC system. In the summer there is a mini-split that keeps the whole area cool. But it’s kind of loud. However, I do have some of these DeLonghi Oil Radiators to use in the winter which provide abundant, silent heat without using very much power. But the downside is that they take awhile to warm up. Wouldn’t it be cool if I could have them turn on an hour early and “pre-warm” the office? Well, to get the obvious part out of the way, yes, there is timer functionality, but that is not nearly as cool as tying it into the rest of my smart home. But it has a remote. What if I could find a way to use Home Assistant to send IR commands to the heater? Turns out you can!

Securing Home Assistant Alexa Integration

One of the big missing pieces from my conversion to Home Assistant was Amazon Alexa integration. It wasn’t something we used a lot, but it was a nice to have. Especially for walking out a room and saying “Alexa, turn off the living room lights.” I had been putting it off a bit because the setup instructions are rather complex. But this weekend I found myself with a couple free hours and decided to work through it. It actually wasn’t as difficult as I expected it to be, but it is definitely not the type of thing a beginner or someone who does not have some programming and sysadmin background could accomplish. But in working through it, there was one thing that was an immediate red flag for me: the need to expose your Home Assistant installation to the Internet. It makes sense that you would need to do this - the Amazon mothership needs to send data to you to take an action after all. But exposing my entire home automation system to the Internet seems like a really, really bad idea. So in doing this, rather than expose port 443 on my router to the Internet and open my entire home to a Shodan attack, I decided to try something a bit different.

Migrating from SmartThings to Home Assistant

I have been a SmartThings user for many years. The orginal reason was that, when we bought our current house in 2012, I wanted to turn the eave lights on at sunset and off a few hours later. After a short attempt to use Wifi-based Wemo switches, I settled on SmartThings and GE Z-Wave switches. I was so happy with it that I started putting them in more places. I added Kwikset SmartCode keypad locks and door sensors. I added more switches, like to turn on the garage overhead lights when the doors opened. I added sensors to monitor the temperature in the closet where I keep my server. And for many years this setup worked great. But over the last year, and especially since Samsung acquired SmartThings, I have become increasingly disillusioned with the SmartThings ecosystem. This last week, my disillusionment and frustration finally boiled over, and I migrated to a new platform. So why did I abandon SmartThings?